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Snowboarding

My Favorite Hobby: Snowboarding

Since moving to Colorado, I have developed a new hobby: snowboarding. Snowboarding is great fun, and the reason I got started is that I used to go surfing when I lived by the beach, and when I moved away from the coast I had to find something new to satisfy my fix for extreme, white-knuckle sport.

When I moved to Grand Junction, everyone was talking about snowboarding, and a lot of my peers considered snowboarding an excellent hobby. When they asked if I wanted to attend, I was more than happy to come along and take part.

snowboarding is fun

 

The next thing I knew I was at the slopes, and I had to let everyone know that I had absolutely no experience of the sport whatsoever. They appeared to understand, and everyone was really helpful when it came to explaining how to get started. In fact, there were so many people trying to teach me what to do, I actually found that I would rather just one person would teach me at a time. The next thing I knew, I was going down the slope and had no idea how to break appropriately, or how to turn. OK, so I’ll admit that getting tuition from a bunch of teenagers was hardly the best idea, but it ensured that I didn’t hold back on anything, and I certainly got off to a flying start. The fact is that you realize it is mostly just common sense, and the thrills that you get are amazing. When you are going down a slope at 30 miles an hour and you do not have to put in an effort to accelerate: that is like flying.

The fact is that I also enjoy snowboarding because it is a great social activity for everyone to enjoy. I had just moved to a new area, and snowboarding really gave me an opportunity to get to know people and is actually the reason why I am friends with the people that I hang around with at the moment. After visiting the slopes a few times, my new friends and I have discovered more common ground, so now we enjoy other activities together, along with the occasional visit to the slopes of course! I’d recommend snowboarding as a great hobby for anyone, particularly those with a passion for extreme sports, or anyone with a sense of adventure. And it’s really great when you actually get involved – there’s a whole culture attached to it.

Some of my friends suggested taking up skiing, but this is something I think I’ll avoid. It is almost like trying to compare a car and a motorbike. A car maybe burns less gas, it may be safer and may even turn corners with more precision, but what would you rather travel in for sheer thrills? Skiing just looks boring compared to snowboarding and the more I get into snowboarding the more my opinion is re-affirmed.

I am glad that I moved away, and I am glad that I managed to find a sport that I enjoy more than surfing. I am hoping to start entering into competitions soon, however, I have a lot of catching up to do with my new friends first!

Getting Started With Snowboarding

If you are thinking about getting started with snowboarding then it really does not have to be as difficult as you are probably imagining. For a start, you can be sure that whatever you are planning to do you can be sure that as soon as you hit the slopes you will almost certainly enjoy yourself. When I was younger I always thought that it would be a really hard thing to get started with, but boy was I wrong. However, what I have to tell you is that I recommend you get lessons first, rather than just hitting the slopes with no idea of what you need to do.

Getting lessons booked does not have to be that difficult. All you need to do is speak with your local snowboarding slope and you can be sure that they will put you in touch with a snowboarding instructor in your area that would be glad to help you out. This may cost anywhere from around $35 an hour, but you can get them even cheaper if you get group lessons. Group lessons mean that more than one person learns at the same time, and it really is a very simple thing to do. I had my first lesson from a friend, however, I would always recommend that it is best to get professional lessons from a man or a lady that is a professional snowboarding instructor. You can be sure that they have been teaching snowboarding for some time, and they are not only good at snowboarding but also have a better idea of how to communicate to a learner.

Many people ask me what they need to buy when they are first starting snowboarding. The answer is that you probably need to buy nothing if you have the right kind of gear in your wardrobe. For those of us that are just getting started, it is best to rent out the gear from your local snowboarding slope. A lot of places will do this for free when you pay a rate to actually use the slope. The reason for this is simple; when you are first learning how to snowboard you may not enjoy it that much. If you do not enjoy it or decide not to take it any further, think of how much money you will have wasted on a snowboard and related stuff. That is why you need to think about ways that you can practice without buying things upfront.

It is important that you get the correct clothes for going to the slope. Even if it is your first time! What I recommend is that you simply must wear gloves, and the thicker the clothes the better. You should really be wearing waterproof gloves but if it is your first time, then there is no point splashing out money on a fancy pair of gloves that you are never going to need in the future. This is just common sense. What I also recommend is that if you have any waterproofs wear them to go on your snowboarding lesson. If you wear them then you will have a great advantage over the competition. The fact is that even if you are wearing clothes that are warm, they will soon become cold once they start getting wet. Despite this, you should still wear warm clothes unless you want to feel cold out there on the slopes. Another thing that is vital is sunglasses. You will find that when you are on the slopes you can find it very challenging to board when you have the sun in your eyes, another issue is that if the sun reflects off the snow then it can blind you if you are not wearing appropriate UV protected sunglasses.

All I have to say is that I am sure that you will enjoy yourself. Go out there and learn to snowboard!

Avoiding Common Snowboarding Injuries

Snowboarding is a fun sport to undertake but it has its risks that you need to be aware of. Nothing would suck more than returning from a snowboarding trip with a broken leg or sprained wrist. There are a number of broad safety measures you can follow to diminish your danger of a snowboarding injury that we will discuss.

Make sure you’re in shape to ski. Organize for your winter sports trip with a training programmed to progress core stability and muscle. Endurance and leg strength is predominantly vital to lend a hand in preventing injuries.

Wear suitable layers of clothing, that don’t confine your movement. You do not want to be all bulked up and unable to move freely. If you cannot move then you cannot snowboard properly and the entire thrill aspect is gone.

Just like any other sporting activity, warm-up and cool down. Before you hit the slopes take some time warming up and stretching to help train your body for action.

The top injury that a majority of the snowboarders receive is a wrist injury. Falls are more frequent during snowboarding. The natural response to a fall is to stretch out a hand to break the fall, and falls tend to occur more often in beginners. For this reason, Colle’s fractures Scaphoid and fractures of the wrist are a relatively common feature, with around 100,000 wrist fractures worldwide among snowboarders each year. Snowboarders should wear wrist guards as they significantly reduce the incidence of wrist injuries during falls. Another common injury is head injuries which can lead to serious conclusions. Helmets are effective in reducing the incidence of minor concussions during low-velocity collisions. Be sure to grab both of these when you do your shopping for snowboarding.

You may think this will save you money, but in the end, it may cost u thousands in hospital bills. Don’t borrow equipment from friends; it significantly increases your risk of injury. If you are hiring equipment make sure you hire from a recommended store. Ensure that all the equipment fits properly. This will help avoid serious injuries and unnecessary falls due to non-fitting equipment.

Another good tip is to Use ‘multi-mode’ release bindings if possible. The superior release available in modern bindings is just one factor that has helped prevent injuries. Rear release boots can significantly reduce the risk of ACL injury.

Self-test your bindings every day. The self-testing of bindings is simple. Step into the binding and then twist to the side to release the toe-piece under the control mechanism. The heel can be tested by stepping into the binding and leaning forward, to release the heel-piece. Both the toe and heel should be able to release if properly adjusted.

The Final Suggestion is to follow the FIS Rules for Conduct in Winter Sports.

 Respect for others

A skier or snowboarder must behave in such a way that he does not endanger or prejudice others.

Control of speed and skiing or snowboarding

A skier or snowboarder must move in control. He must adapt his speed and manner of skiing or snowboarding to his personal ability and to the prevailing conditions of terrain, snow, and weather as well as to the density of traffic.

Choice of route

A skier or snowboarder coming from behind must choose his route in such a way that he does not endanger skiers or snowboarders ahead.

Overtaking

A skier or snowboarder may overtake another skier or snowboarder above or below and to the right or to the left provided that he leaves enough space for the overtaken skier or snowboarder to make any voluntary or involuntary movement.

Entering, starting and moving upwards

A skier or snowboarder entering a marked run, starting again after stopping or moving upwards on the slopes must look up and down the slopes that he can do so without endangering himself or others.

Stopping on the piste

Unless it is absolutely necessary, a skier or snowboarder must avoid stopping on the piste in narrow places or where visibility is restricted. After a fall in such a place, a skier or snowboarder must move clear of the piste as soon as possible.

Climbing and descending on foot

A skier or snowboarder either climbing or descending on foot must keep to the side of the piste.

Respect for signs and markings

A skier or snowboarder must respect all signs and markings.

Assistance

At accidents, every skier or snowboarder is duty-bound to assist.

Identification

Every skier or snowboarder and witness, whether a responsible party or not, must exchange names and addresses following an accident.

With all these tips that have been shared with you, I hope you learned something and will have a very safe trip. Come home in one piece and start planning the next.

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